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What did you learn? What can you share: Lessons of Cascade Fire

    • 2564 posts
    1
    October 13, 2017 11:12:04 PM PDT

    1. What did YOU learn from the Cascade Fire?

    2. Of what you leaened what  are YOU  willing to share?

     

    • 1030 posts
    2
    October 14, 2017 8:25:11 AM PDT
    My home was actually safer than I thought due to my 100'+ clearance and could have stayed in my travel trailer because I had a generator and plenty of fuel for 2 weeks. I have a asphalt area with no trees or tall grass nearby. I had the ability to use the generator and my 3000 gallons of water + my well to keep my area wet. Plenty of food, but, the smoke and ash would have been a possible problem.
    • 1526 posts
    3
    October 14, 2017 9:01:59 AM PDT
    Our home was not touched....however, it was close. I'm getting 100 feet of single braid firehose and 200 feet of forestry hose, plus nozzle and couplings. There is a hydrant at the end of my driveway. It won't be idle next time.
    • 195 posts
    4
    October 14, 2017 5:48:58 PM PDT
    I learned that people jump in to help others. Donations have poured in to Loma Rica Community Church. Help is there if you need it.
    • 4977 posts
    5
    October 14, 2017 8:14:09 PM PDT
    I learned I might stay if there is a next time;
    I learned our officials were trying to starve us out and prevented items from crossing the evacuation lines either direction so we would leave against our will;
    some people got in and other kept out with no idea what made the difference;
    good, reliable up to date and factual information was unavailable (but crews of all types could be sent anywahere so someone knew what was going on everywhere as someentity was coordinating everything);
    I learned defensible space should be a huge priority and you still might lose your home;
    I already knew the people of Yuba Sutter are some of the most generous people in the entire world;
    I already knew our first responders work very, very hard to do their jobs. Same for the PG&E crews, phone crews, tree trimming crews, and so many more that will be working hard on our behalf as things start to get put back together.
    All are appreciated.
    • 2564 posts
    6
    October 16, 2017 3:04:44 PM PDT
    coolbreeze said:
    Our home was not touched....however, it was close. I'm getting 100 feet of single braid firehose and 200 feet of forestry hose, plus nozzle and couplings. There is a hydrant at the end of my driveway. It won't be idle next time.
    Tell us more about the hydrant, please.
    • 2564 posts
    7
    October 16, 2017 3:08:37 PM PDT
    2Grands said:
    I learned I might stay if there is a next time;
    2Grands, Is this a "crying wolf" too many times response?? YOu bet your life.
    I learned our officials were trying to starve us out and prevented items from crossing the evacuation lines either direction so we would leave against our will; some people got in and other kept out with no idea what made the difference; good, reliable up to date and factual information was unavailable (but crews of all types could be sent anywahere so someone knew what was going on everywhere as someentity was coordinating everything); I learned defensible space should be a huge priority and you still might lose your home; I already knew the people of Yuba Sutter are some of the most generous people in the entire world; I already knew our first responders work very, very hard to do their jobs. Same for the PG&E crews, phone crews, tree trimming crews, and so many more that will be working hard on our behalf as things start to get put back together. All are appreciated.
    • 2564 posts
    8
    October 16, 2017 3:13:37 PM PDT
    2Grands said:
    I learned I might stay if there is a next time; I learned our officials were trying to starve us out and prevented items from crossing the evacuation lines either direction so we would leave against our will; some people got in and other kept out with no idea what made the difference; good, reliable up to date and factual information was unavailable (but crews of all types could be sent anywahere so someone knew what was going on everywhere as someentity was coordinating everything); I learned defensible space should be a huge priority and you still might lose yourhome;
    As the information comes available:
    Were there any houses with fire safe clearance that burned?
    Were there any houses without fire safe clearance that did not burn?
    I already knew the people of Yuba Sutter are some of the most generous people in the entire world; I already knew our first responders work very, very hard to do their jobs. Same for the PG&E crews, phone crews, tree trimming crews, and so many more that will be working hard on our behalf as things start to get put back together. All are appreciated.
    • 1526 posts
    9
    October 17, 2017 9:27:41 AM PDT
    Dick, not a lot to say about the hydrant. BVID told me it was separate from BVID water. It is a jones "dry": hydrant I believe. BVID, if I heard them correct, says OK in rural areas to use hydrant if necessary. I have a long cement drive, about 150 feet, so I'll need about 300 ft of hose to cover my home, not my acreage, (and others around me if possible). Uses a special wrench so as not to damage the spindle.
    • 1526 posts
    10
    October 17, 2017 9:37:16 AM PDT
    Dick, all the above, including the wrench costs a bit, but I believe these fires will happen again. I'll be ready. I didn't evacuate, instead we parked a couple miles away and saw the NW wind was blowing away from us. I took the chance to return, glad I did. We stayed throughput the entire time. When I bought this home in '06 I was told the small discoloring in my kitchen ceiling was due to the foam a firefighter accidenttly shot under the roof tiles. Now these fires. I presume it will happen again. So glad there is a hydrant at the end of my drive. For us AND neighbors. I was really kicking myself for not being ready, and a hydrant right at the end of drive. Next time will be better.
    • 1526 posts
    11
    October 17, 2017 9:42:09 AM PDT
    We can't rely on others (state, county, or fed govt.), although I know they work hard. I fought the big king city fire in the seventies. We have to look out for ourselves. I heard a tree into a power pole caused the cascade fire. But, I'm really concerned why a lookout tower didn't see the fire sooner. Are these towers manned or is this a cost-cutting agenda.
    • 4977 posts
    12
    October 17, 2017 2:10:05 PM PDT
    DickBoyd said:
    2Grands, Is this a "crying wolf" too many times response?? You bet your life.
    No, I've never witnessed local officials crying wolf. What I meant is I did not appreciate how we were treated in regards to the evacuation lines. I witnessed law enforcement treating other law enforcement people poorly; people were threatened with arrest for handing meds out of the evacuation area, and anyone trying to hand in food, meds, supplies was treated like a common criminal. Some people were in fact given freedom to come and go out of the evacuation area. When I asked supposed officals about things, I was treated poorly. You were not to question anything!!! That is unacceptable, period. There was a definite effort by our law enforcement to not allow anything in so those needing something would be forced out. Starve 'em out is what I heard. 
    I've heard people say 'fend for yourself" if you don't like how law enforcement handled things. Isn't that what you do by creating a defenisble space around your property? By having some supplies and being ready to be on your own for a few days a least? There were people that stayed on guard in our area the entire time; we had no fire trucks (pickup of otherwise) through our area until Wednesday after the fire started. Along with many others, I will most likely stay put if there is a next time.  All the houses I've seen that are still standing had a green area around them and some had homeowners that stayed and fought. 
    I had three out of state firefighters tell me this was their most unorganized fire. 
    As I've stated, the front line firefighters, PG&E, tree trimmers and AT&T guys are all appreciated. I'm not happy with those we pay to "protect and serve" becuase they treated us very, very poorly. 
    • 2564 posts
    13
    October 18, 2017 10:28:09 AM PDT
    coolbreeze said:
    We can't rely on others (state, county, or fed govt.), although I know they work hard. I fought the big king city fire in the seventies. We have to look out for ourselves. I heard a tree into a power pole caused the cascade fire. But, I'm really concerned why a lookout tower didn't see the fire sooner. Are these towers manned or is this a cost-cutting agenda.

    Speaking as an individual who is a volunteer unpaid lookout. Not an official statement from anyone. My comments as Jeremy's grandfather. Oregon Peak, Pike County and Sawmill are the towers that have Neptune/Cascade in their viewshed. Banner. Wolf, Mount Howell are iffy. The Cascade fire was declared after 11 PM on Sun 10/8/17. Early reports said AM. Towers are not manned at night except under certain RED FLAG conciitions. Yes, REDFLAG was in effect. Cascade is not direct line of sight from any tower. Yes, it was a clear moonlit night. Any smoke woud be a top smoke. Any wind at all and the location of a fire is a guess.

    Pike county is manned by the Forest Service with paid professionals. Sawmill is staffed by paid professionals under certain REDFLAG conditions.

    Oregon Peak, Banner, Wolf are staffed by VIP. Volunteers in Prevention. VIP needs volunteers. Call your nearest CalFire or send me a private message to learn how to become a VIP. Yes, I did see the red glaref of Cascade from my bedroom after PG&E woke me up at 1 AM to tell me about a power outage.

    • 2564 posts
    14
    October 18, 2017 3:37:54 PM PDT
    coolbreeze said:
    Our home was not touched....however, it was close. I'm getting 100 feet of single braid firehose and 200 feet of forestry hose, plus nozzle and couplings. There is a hydrant at the end of my driveway. It won't be idle next time.

    Wharf valves. The "hydrants' that I know of are part of BVID or North Yuba Water. And are not, to the best of my knowledge, dedicated to fire fighting. I non't know of any wharf valves under YCWA or Brownsville control.

    BVID meeting that mentioned whar valves.

    http://bvid.org/files/mn_03_24_16.pdf scroll down to last page.


    The other places where I have seen wharf valves, Valley of the Eagles, Peoria Ridge Estates, Dobbins, Yes Academy, Township Road were probably part of a defunct fire fighting system. Defunct in that the communities where these valves are did not recognize their maintenance responsibility. The water for most of these wharf valves is from ponds which are full of weeds. The ponds that were expanded to provide water were never maintained. Linings failed, pipes failed, the ponds dried up. There are other places, Dollar General in Loma Rica, the never completed storage area on Marysville Road by the Sheriff's Posse that have large tanks for wet stuff. My impression is that they were built for a one time inspecion to get permission to continue with a project. I don't think there was follow up to make sure there was water in the tanks. Something along the lines of every hydrant will be checked three weeks before a fire. A few years ago, there was a national effort to identify the location of wet stuff to put on red stuff. Never happened. I do have ablue post st my driveway to identify the Smith Ditch as a source of wet stuff for the red stuff. So what, the dispatch centers and visiting firemen don't know the water is there. Nor do they understand the blue post.

    • 2564 posts
    15
    October 19, 2017 1:12:24 PM PDT
    DickBoyd said:
    coolbreeze said:
    We can't rely on others (state, County and Sawmill are the towers that have Neptune/Cascade in their Correction. Sawmill lookout is near Paradise. Sunset Hills is near Challange. Sunset Hills would have Cascade in the viewshed. Moot point since neither was staffed.
    • 2564 posts
    16
    October 19, 2017 1:13:42 PM PDT
    One comment that pops out. Earlier notification. Any suggestions on how to get earlier reporting?
    • 1526 posts
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    October 19, 2017 1:51:00 PM PDT
    BVID told me the hydrant (not a wharf valve) is separate from BVID. As the outlet is removed, altho it is a "dry" hydrant (simply meaning the water comes from the bottom of hydrant when spindle is turned. There IS water in the hydrant. IF it is bvid water, then if I need the hydrant I will open the BVID valve in the ground. It's all good.
    • 1526 posts
    18
    October 19, 2017 1:54:47 PM PDT
    I take that back. It is a wharf valve, but it should work fine, and like I said, if I need the BVID turned on, then that's what I'll do. There should be a number of these in Loma Rica. Homeowners cut me break as the hydrant is right at the end of my drive.
    • 1526 posts
    19
    October 19, 2017 2:00:41 PM PDT
    Wharf hydrants ARE used for fire dept. outlet.
    • 1526 posts
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    October 19, 2017 3:10:33 PM PDT
    I meant homeowners INSURANCE cut me a break.
    • 1526 posts
    21
    October 19, 2017 3:11:15 PM PDT
    I'll let you know how the hydrant works a little later.
    • 342 posts
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    October 19, 2017 11:19:26 PM PDT
    coolbreeze--this is from BVID's website: SECTION 2.1.18. WATER FILL LOCATIONS (Wharf Valves) Some District pipelines have wharf valve connections, which can be used as water fills for firefighting and other irrigation or non-irrigation purposes, including construction water (See Section 4.1.4 WATER TRUCK LOADING PERMIT for the permitting requirements for the use of Wharf Valves for non-irrigation purposes). Customers with water truck loading permits will be permitted to fill their tanks at specified locations as determined in the District’s sole discretion. While the District permits these valves to be used on an emergency basis for firefighting purposes, there will be times when no water service is available from these lines. Accordingly, the District makes no guarantee or assurance that any water will be available in its water system or in adequate quantities or pressure for firefighting purposes. In determining if a proposed location is suitable for the installation of a wharf valve, the District will take into consideration operation and maintenance requirements and other factors deemed important at the proposed site. The District will determine the location of these valves using its sole discretion. (Revised 05/14/2015)
    • 1526 posts
    23
    October 20, 2017 8:25:47 AM PDT
    wingnut, thanks. My wife says the fire dept opens the hydrant now and then (probably annually) to check the flow. Not recently, but last year. There was water, and I don;';t mean the bvid in the ground. I'll be checking the hydrant shortly and we'll know for sure. These wharf, as you call them, actually refers to the top brass assembly. They are actually a fire hydrant, it's purpose to fight fire, or sometimes an independant action. I'll know for sure in a while, a little later. But, thanks always for the info. It will be some time before the people of this area will be comfortable again. Of course, a fire line perimeter is also great, but not always possible. The dept also always clears the brush around the hydrant regularly. So, it would appear they work, and that's always good news. A person would use a 2.5" fire hose, single or double jacket, ( the outlet 2.5 inch I.D.) then adapt down to 1.5" forestry hose for greater pressure, up to 60 ft. spray or stream. We were stricktly lucky, as some people lives are ruined. Feel very bad for them. A NE wid would have doomed us. As always mother nature deals the hand. Anything we can do to turn her away is always good. Prayers for all who lost their homes and possessions.
    • 4977 posts
    24
    October 20, 2017 1:57:02 PM PDT
    Some of you are discussing and suggesting fire hose and a pump, especially for those with a swimming pool (or pond?).
    Can you give some guidance on where to buy so I don't go buy junk that will fail when needed? I thought about maybe making or buying a cart so it would be portable. that might be nice if a neighbor catches fire and I can help. Just some thoughts.
    • 1526 posts
    25
    October 20, 2017 5:35:48 PM PDT
    hose direct is a good online store. I have an inground pool and thought of using that, also. Good pumps are everywhere BUT, make sure it's not a rebuilt, but new.
  • TN
    • 420 posts
    26
    October 20, 2017 10:33:56 PM PDT
    This fire is exactly why you have to have an independent source of water as described on my site firecarts.com . I don't build too many of these pumps currently,and not trying to sell now, but my site has a lot of good info. PGE out meant no well water, BVID went out for most right away. Even if irrigation water worked, pressure is usually low from everyone using it. On the Stanfield hill ridge above Collins Lake I had 8 firecarts at structures. It was hit by a wall of flames three separate times. The pumps allowed the one engine available to patrol and protect other structures. We lost one unoccupied mobile due to structure triage and manpower. I wouldn't advise fighting a fire like this, especially on a mountain ridge, but those guy's did the firefight of their lives. Also keeping the fire from jumping Marysville rd at Leah and close to the deli. We lost it near Dolan Harding eventually. We were still having hot spots on Thursday. I haven't checked in for a while, but want to evaluate the fire. We fought like hell and didn't get air support for 17 hours because the Cascade was the smallest of current Ca fires. This fire is in the record books. My guess is it was driven by 50-80 MPH winds. Bart, with Dobbins Fire.
  • TN
    • 420 posts
    27
    October 20, 2017 10:38:09 PM PDT
    Firecarts also has a facebook page that I haven't updated in several years.
    • 2564 posts
    28
    October 21, 2017 8:00:44 AM PDT
    1. Social media.

    We are on the steep part of the learning curve on how to use social media in emergency situations. Supervisor Bradford made attempts to get participation, From Napoleon's Corporal point of view, Bradford's comments were counterproductive. He meant well, but the wrong message came across. Supervisor Fletcher and the County CAO advised against soliciting comments from the public. They may not have said that. But that is what I heard. Oh, by the way, thank you in advance for the advice to contact my supervisor. What I will hear is that I am the only one with the problem. Translated meaning is they can safely ignore what I have to say because not enough other people are commenting.

    2. Rapid response for erosion control. Someone has started erosion control, Dawn, Kimberly and other LR roads are getting sand bags and rice straw erosion control. Thank you for getting the sand bags and straw in place before the rain.
    • 1526 posts
    29
    October 24, 2017 12:40:09 PM PDT
    atart with a large dtameter hose, then after a hundred ft adapt ot a smaller size for 60 ft stream Say 3.5 inch to start then agapy to 1.5 Works well.
    • 1526 posts
    30
    October 25, 2017 8:47:01 AM PDT
    always shoot at the base of the flames.
    • 362 posts
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    October 25, 2017 10:37:28 AM PDT
    coolbrezze wrote in part.
    But, I'm really concerned why a lookout tower didn't see the fire sooner. Are these towers manned or is this a cost-cutting agenda.
    MY RESPONSE. The US Forest Service has been eliminating lookout towers for years and Cal Fire has not been manning critical look out towers claiming lack of funds although they operate a 400 acre Cal Fire play ground at Ione.
    The Ponderosa fire could have been prevented in its entirety if Sunset Hill lookout would have been manned.
    Decades ago I wrote an article entitled :"Act now before California burns" and sent it to 27 newspaper's.
    The powers that be ignored my suggestions and began eliminating the lookout towers
    Having said all that my heart goes out to all the victims of the horrible fires.
    The wind was the main culprit.
    • 4977 posts
    32
    October 25, 2017 7:54:54 PM PDT
    I hope we have some type of community meeting to discuss issues with the fire.

    Not allowing people to give food or meds in or out, being threatened with arrest for handing meds OUT OF the evac area, letting some folks in and not allowing others, poor information, poor treatment by those who are supposed to help us.

    The good is the amazing amount of donations and community support for those affected; some very dedicated first responders who worked very hard on our behalf, utility crews working hard to get things somewhat back to normal, and from what I've seen, good information about the process to put lives back together.

    We'll have another fire and we'll have another flood. I want to be part of making things better and not just complaining. Monday morning quarterbacking is pretty easy. I've heard some great ideas and suggestions that can help us next time. Wish I would have written them down!!
    • 2564 posts
    33
    October 26, 2017 9:43:03 AM PDT
    2Grands said:
    I hope we have some type of community meeting to discuss issues with the fire. 
    Next meeting is on November 8th or December 13th, 2017 @
    Alcouffe Community Center, Dobbins 9:30 am-noon
    Please send proposed agenda itmes to:

    Martha Burke
    Forester, RPF #2918 and GIS Specialist
    Yuba Watershed Protection & Fire Safe Council Coordinator
    Applied Forest Managemen
    200 Litton Drive, Suite 310
    Grass Valley, CA 95945
    (530) 274-6454 (o)
    (530) 913-6450 (c)
    (530) 274-0411 (f)
    Agriculture extension office has na new Glenn Nader.
    • 2564 posts
    34
    October 26, 2017 12:15:33 PM PDT
    clipper said:
    ... MY RESPONSE. The US Forest Service has been eliminating lookout towers for years and Cal Fire has not been manning critical look out towers ...
    Dick Boyd (vox populi) comments. From my point of view, it wasn' the forest service, part of the executive branch, that eliminated staffing towers. The towers and several other forest management services were cut by Congress. Perhaps indirectly by budget cuts or line item earmarks of what the executcive branch could do or not do.
    Some of the technical advances reduced the need of lookouts, but, in my observations, those technical things were not adopted. Satellite imagery, micro weather prediction, inversion layers, fire tornadoes, video monitoring, water management, fuels management, to mention a few. Since I am in the finger pointing mode. Citizens who sent those kinds of people to congress should be requierd to pass a citizenship test before being allowed to vote. Is there someone I did not insult? Speak up.
  • TN
    • 420 posts
    35
    November 1, 2017 8:58:07 AM PDT
    Clipper, since the fire started at night, I don't believe any lookout would have ever been manned. We were there almost from the start and it was already to the top Leanne because of the intense wind
    . Our only goal then was to keep it from jumping Marysville Rd. With only one engine for quite a while we put out many spots until we lost it between the Deli and Collins Lake.
  • TN
    • 420 posts
    36
    November 1, 2017 9:03:27 AM PDT
    Coo breeze, for your structure protection I would stick with 1-1/2" hose (type 187 type II) Anything bigger is very hard to pull around in a hurry. Also Fire departments can hook into it instead of laying their own hose out. 1" is good except there are two common threads out there. Which means if a fire department wants to use or extend their hose it may not fit. Currently we use 1"NPSH, but some departments use NH or NST. 1-1/2 is the same thread for all departments.
  • TN
    • 420 posts
    37
    November 1, 2017 9:05:14 AM PDT
    As far as irrigation hydrants, BVID mainly uses 1-1/4"NPT which is not a fire thread. I keep adapters so local engines can fill. However In most of our big fires Irrigation water is not there or depleted
  • TN
    • 420 posts
    38
    November 1, 2017 9:05:55 AM PDT
    Just a bit of September/October fire history in our districts. 49er fire: 1988, 33,700 acres, 312 structures. Williams fire: 1997, 5700 acres, 80 structures, 1999 Pendola fire: 11,725 acres, 76 structures. And now the Cascade fire, 9989 acres, 143 structures.
    You have to be proactive and independent with your own water storage and more importantly, clearing brush. Besides being a fire hazard, many driveways and roads were blocked with trees. When it is wet enough, burn tightly stacked burn piles hot and clean if it can't be chipped. Neighbors are going to have to deal with smoke. If you burn it right it won't smolder for long. Don't just try to light whole trees, stack piles tight.
  • TN
    • 420 posts
    39
    November 1, 2017 10:57:40 AM PDT
    2Grands, most gas pumps are high volume, not high pressure. You really want high pressure for fire. Although I haven't made any in a while, there is a lot of info on my site firecarts.com. The pumps I use are honda, and they only make two higher pressure pumps. The smaller one is fine unless you have to pump up a high elevation to get to the fire. After the pump you need correct adapters to convert threads to fire thread.
    • 1526 posts
    40
    November 1, 2017 12:34:50 PM PDT
    TN, thanks for the info. Yes, I was advised to go from 2.5" to 1.5" because of the effort to drag the hose. Right now, I'm addressing the hydrant (make sure it works), then go from there.......
  • TN
    • 420 posts
    41
    November 1, 2017 4:49:48 PM PDT
    Cool Breeze, Unless your fighting a full blown structure fire, 1-1/2 is plenty. Is it an irrigation hydrant or a private tank?
    • 1526 posts
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    November 1, 2017 5:56:01 PM PDT
    TN, not sure. Looks like what is called a wharf, single 2.5" outlet.
  • TN
    • 420 posts
    43
    November 1, 2017 6:47:02 PM PDT
    A 2-1/2 female NST X 1-1/2" male NST adapter is fairly cheap. Sometimes called NH. I was just wondering what was the water source and if there was good pressure at the hydrant.
    • 1526 posts
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    November 1, 2017 7:35:44 PM PDT
    TN, not sure yet. It IS 2.5" male outlet. Have wrench, will open it soon to see the pressure and source. Hava an idea it is either sole source or BVID. Will see soon. Thanks for the help, tho. Will get back soon.
    • 2564 posts
    45
    November 2, 2017 10:11:28 AM PDT
    2Grands said:
    DickBoyd said:
    2Grands, Is this a "crying wolf" too many times response?? You bet your life.
    3Grands replied:
    No, I've never witnessed local officials crying wolf. What I meant is I did not appreciate how we were treated in regards to the evacuation lines.
    SNIP 
    As I've stated, the front line firefighters, PG&E, tree trimmers and AT&T guys are all appreciated. I'm not happy with those we pay to "protect and serve" becuase they treated us very, very poorly. 
    dickboyd replies:
    Thanks 2Grands, I agree. What should we do? What can we do? To ger better information? Information we can act on with confidence.
    • 2564 posts
    46
    November 2, 2017 10:38:13 AM PDT
    coolbreeze said:
    TN, not sure yet. It IS 2.5" male outlet. Have wrench, will open it soon to see the pressure and source. Hava an idea it is either sole source or BVID. Will see soon. Thanks for the help, tho. Will get back soon.

    WORKERS AND SHRIKERS

    There seems to be a rule in firefighting to get the water where you can find it.

    I notice that some structures have large storage tanks to hold water for fire fighting. Alcouffe Center, for example. Some houses have roadside standpipes to connect to water delivery trucks.

    So what?

    The so what is that a person who works to clean up their place and works to have water for fire fighitng can be defeated by the shirker who steals the water during a fire and throws their garbage over the fence for their neighbor to take care of.

    Don't get me started on non governing government. Who signed off on occupancy permits? What did the permit say regarding water to fight fires? Roadside fuel clearance? Shoulder maintenance? Vertical clearance? Number of evacuation routes? Roadway slope? Gate width?

    • 2564 posts
    47
    November 2, 2017 10:48:40 AM PDT
    Clarification. I think Coolbreeze is an honorable person. My comment, which some may call a complaint, is that Coolbreeze may have been misled or had a different understanding of what the realtor said. Or what county officials said.
    • 1526 posts
    48
    November 2, 2017 12:08:57 PM PDT
    Here's what's happening: Water guy came by, said wharf has good pressure (60-80), runs off as main line (not bvid), and i'd be within my rights to open 'er up if needed. TN, I appreciate your help, really. Water guy said some of these wharfs have 100psi. Pretty good. And yes, I will adapt to 1.5 inch from outlet. Thanks again.
    Mr. Boyd, sometimes (and I don't mean to offend, but your thinking gets in the way of doing....if ya know what I mean. Once again, just so ya know, as your negative comments on the wharf hydrant were completely wrong...they work good, and no, they are not drawing up weeds.
  • TN
    • 420 posts
    49
    November 2, 2017 6:10:14 PM PDT
    Cool Breeze, that's great pressure and should work most of fire season. Be aware BVID shuts down soon. Also many times the irrigation water pressure or availability is not there during fires. In this fire much of it was off. Thats why I encourage a tank of your own with a 2 1/2" NST fitting. I don't encourage the county required 4 1/2" fitting unless you have to have it inspected. In an emergency you can even use a blue tarp and hay bales to create a pool for fire engines to draw from. Those adapters are available from me or ACE at a decent price for $30 or so. Good luck!
    • 2564 posts
    50
    November 2, 2017 6:55:16 PM PDT
    http://cdfdata.fire.ca.gov/pub/fireplan/fpupload/fpppdf322.pdf
    In 2005 there were projects ton install water tanks for fire fighting as well as vegetation clearing programs.
    The water tanks, in my opinion, took on a political flavor. Instead of the tanks being placed near the potential fires, the tanks were allocated by Supervisors district. Foothills got one tank I believe it was placed near Browns Valley School. Which is near year round ditches and streams.
    There wer also projects, I believe nationwide. For visiting firemen. Local people know where local water is. I do not know of any Yuba County locations that have pressurized water dedicated to fire fighting. Do visiting firemen know where this water is ?